Can you use a different name without legally changing it?

Can you use a different name without legally changing it?

Can you use a different name without legally changing it?

Most states allow one or both spouses to change their last names without a separate name change petition after getting married. You could choose to take your spouse's last name, hyphenate your last names, or in some states, choose a new last name unrelated to either your name or your spouse's name.

Can you go by a different first name?

Typically, you may legally change your name to whatever name you'd like, although state marriage laws may also provide some additional legal guidance. There are some exceptions though.

Do I have to use my legal first name?

There is no law preventing you from being known by a single name, or mononym — that is, a first name only, with no surname — and HM Passport Office should accept such a name, although they may be more sceptical of your application.

Can you go by a different name professionally?

You can use both last names—with a hyphen or without. You can take your spouse's name, but use your former name strictly in a professional setting. Some states even allow you to move your old name to your middle name, and then tack on your new last one.

Can you use a different name professionally?

This is a legal process called Usage, or Common Law Name Change. BUT, no one else is REQUIRED to accept that, legally. Professional Licensing, Social Security, DMV, Banks, etc., will NOT. To be universally accepted, you need a court order or government issued Certificate.

What does legal first name mean?

The name that identifies a person for legal, administrative and other official purposes. A person's first legal name generally is the name of the person that was given for the purpose of registration of the birth and which then appears on a birth certificate, but may change subsequently.

Can I legally make my middle name my first name?

Michael Robert Kirschbaum. It is perfectly legal to use your middle name or even variations of your name, as long as you are not attempting to defraud anyone.

What if your name is different on my birth certificate?

Answer: The most effective way would be to legally change your name through a court order. Name Changes are filed in District Court, in the county where you reside. You will need to contact the District Court in the county where you reside in order to obtain the needed forms.

What if my child has a different last name?

The best document you can carry with you when traveling with a minor with a different last name, is the child's birth certificate. ... While there is no hard-and-fast form for you to use, it's important that you put together a signed and notarized consent letter from the child's parent or parents.

What do you need to know before legally changing your name?

  • If you're changing your name due to marriage,the first thing you need to do is contact Social Security. This is step one. ...
  • If you're not getting married,you need to complete a court petition. You'll have to attend a hearing. ...
  • It's a long process. ...
  • You can name yourself almost anything,with a few important exceptions. ...

How much does it cost to change your last name?

  • In most states, you have to pay a fee (usually $150 to $200) to file your name change petition in court. It also costs a small amount of money to get forms notarized. And if you're getting married, you may want to pay for additional certified copies of your marriage certificate to use as proof of your new last name.

What to do if you change your name?

  • The most important thing to do to legally change your name is to start using your new name. Introduce yourself using your new name, fill out forms and applications under your new name, tell all of your family and friends to only refer to you using your new name, and tell your school and/or employer of your new name.

Can you legally change the spelling of your given name?

  • Legally changing the spelling of your name requires the same steps as changing to a new name; you must file the appropriate forms in the court with jurisdiction over your place of residence. This usually means a county civil court, sometimes also known as a circuit court or district court.

Related Posts: