Where do we use Whose?

Where do we use Whose?

Where do we use Whose?

Whose is a possessive pronoun. Use it when you're asking (or telling) to whom something belongs. For example: whose sandwich is this?

Can you use Whose for companies?

It is just fine for anything at all. You cannot use which there. However, it does make a difference whether you use whose as a relative pronoun or as an interrogative pronoun.

How do you use Whose in a sentence?

We use whose to introduce a relative clause indicating possession by people, animals and things:

  1. John works with that other chap whose name I can't remember.
  2. Shirley has a 17-year-old daughter whose ambition is to be a photographer.
  3. This is the book whose title I couldn't remember.

Can whose be used for non personal antecedents?

Usage. Users of the inanimate whose employ it as a relative pronoun with non-personal antecedents, as in: "That's the car whose alarm keeps waking us up at night." Those who avoid using whose with non-personal antecedents assert that it is the genitive (possessive) of only the relative pronoun who.

Can them be used for objects?

Them is used to refer to the object of a clause. ... Them can be used as both a direct object pronoun as shown in the example above, or an indirect object pronoun. An indirect object refers to a third participant in the action described by the verb, often someone who receives something as a result of it.

Who's vs Whose?

Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who's is a contraction of the words who is or who has. However, many people still find whose and who's particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.

Can you use them for objects?

Them is used to refer to the object of a clause. ... Them can be used as both a direct object pronoun as shown in the example above, or an indirect object pronoun. An indirect object refers to a third participant in the action described by the verb, often someone who receives something as a result of it.

Is whose used only for persons?

To summarize, when the word "whose" is used as an interrogative pronoun, it can only refer to a person; however, when it is used as a relative pronoun, the word "whose" can indeed refer to things and objects.

Why do we use Whose?

When do you use whose? The word whose is possessive, and it is often used as an adjective, which is a word that describes or clarifies a noun or a pronoun. So, in this case, whose is a possessive adjective, because it describes who owns something.

Can whose be used for plural?

The word "whose" can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and its form doesn't change.

Whose for objects?

  • Milton, Shakespeare, and a slew of other writers have used "whose" to refer to objects. As for a modern example, the Oxford Learner's Dictionaries uses this sentence: It's the house whose door is painted red.

When do you use whose?

  • ‘Whose’ is used when talking about an object belonging to someone, normally a person or animal.’Who’s is a shortened form of ‘who is’. When you are wondering whether to use ‘who’s’ or ‘whose’, the rule is simple.

Whose for object?

  • When used as a pronoun to an object it is called referring to an inanimate antecedent and is accepted. It's been in common use for more than 400 years. Milton, Shakespeare, and a slew of other writers have used "whose" to refer to objects.

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