Can you use 'i've as I have?

Can you use 'i've as I have?

Can you use 'i've as I have?

I would normally use "I've" as a contraction where "have" is an auxiliary verb. That would include the use of "I've got" to mean "I have".

Is it youve or you have?

You've is the usual spoken form of 'you have', especially when 'have' is an auxiliary verb.

When should you use you ve?

You've is the usual spoken form of 'you have,' when 'have' is an auxiliary verb. You've got to see it to believe it.

Can you say we've instead of we have?

We've is the usual spoken form of 'we have,' especially when 'have' is an auxiliary verb. It's the first time we've been to the cinema together as a family.

Can I say I've instead of I have?

As for the contraction, Sydney Greenbaum, writing in the Oxford English Grammar, describes “I've” as the contracted form of “I have” when “have” is either a primary verb or an auxiliary.

Can I've mean I have?

I've is the usual spoken form of 'I have,' especially when 'have' is an auxiliary verb.

Have vs have grammar?

When we are talking about possession, relationships, illnesses and characteristics of people or things we can use either have or have got. The have got forms are more common in an informal style. Have got has the same meaning as have and both are used as present tenses.

Whats you've means?

contraction of you have:You've already been there.

What is mean by you ve?

contraction of you have:You've already been there.

What type word is you ve?

you've is a contraction: you have.

When do you use " You've " and when " you have "?

  • “You have” is more formal and “you’ve” is more informal so you would use “you have” in a research paper (“you have two types of chromosones in your body”) and “you’ve” in a pop song (“you’ve only got to ask and I’ll be there”). It’s fine to say “if you’ve any questions, just ask”. Let's pull back and take a look at the big picture.

Can you use " have " as a contract in English?

  • In American English, you can't contract "have" if you are using it as a plain (not a "helping" or "auxiliary") verb. "I've a dog" and "They've a great time" are not grammatical in American English. There are a number of other restrictions on contractions of "have" besides the one you cite.

When do you use'if you have any questions'?

  • ‘If you’ve any questions…’ is a common phrase, so is acceptable. In formal writing, many writers prefer to avoid contractions in general, so you have is safer. 8 clever moves when you have $1,000 in the bank.

Can you say " I've not been there " after " have "?

  • For example, you can't use contracted "have" followed by "not": "I've not been there" is not grammatical in American English even though "I've been there" is—if you want to contract, you have to say "I haven't been there". I discussed this in a question about I’ven’t. I think what you feel uncomfortable with is contraction of "have" as a main verb.

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