How do you use whether in a question?

How do you use whether in a question?

How do you use whether in a question?

Use whether, but not if, immediately before 'or not': The question is whether or not the government has the right to interfere. Whether is generally preferred when 'or' appears later in the sentence, but you can also use if: It is not clear whether/if the information was stolen or deliberately leaked to the press.

How do you ask for advice example?

Asking for advice

  1. What do you suggest / recommend we do this evening?
  2. What should I do when I'm in Brighton?
  3. What ought I do on Sunday?
  4. Could you recommend a good restaurant near here?
  5. Could you suggest somewhere to go for a drink?
  6. Do you know the quickest way to the train station?

How do you use whether in a sentence?

Whether sentence example

  1. Whether we want to admit it or not, we all wish everyone would like us. ...
  2. He needs you right now, whether he knows it or not. ...
  3. I really don't know whether to finish him or not. ...
  4. I was unsure whether my husband would actually come with me. ...
  5. Whether or not you take my deal, I'll help her.

What is the best way to give advice?

5 Simple ways to give advice in English

  1. Use a modal verb. There are two modal verbs we often use for giving advice: 'should' and 'ought to'. ...
  2. Make it into a question. ...
  3. Put yourself in the person's position. ...
  4. Make a suggestion. ...
  5. Advise in a stronger way.

Can you use whether without or not?

A: In the phrase “whether or not,” the “or not” is often optional. When the choice is up to you, you can generally use either “whether” or “if.” But you definitely need “or not” when you mean “regardless of whether,” as in, “I'm out of here whether you like it or not!”

How do you say I need your advice?

Examples include:

  1. ”I am writing to ask if you could help me with…”
  2. ”I would appreciate if you could give me some advice about…”
  3. ”I am writing to ask for your advice.”
  4. ”I wonder if you could help me with a problem.”

Can you please advise or advice?

Do you use “Please advice” or “Please advise”? Well, the correct phrase is actually “Please advise”. Some grammar experts say that “Please advise” must have an object after the phrase because advise is a transitive verb. But since it's widely used (especially in email), “Please advise” is grammatically accepted.

Can we use whether without or?

A: In the phrase “whether or not,” the “or not” is often optional. When the choice is up to you, you can generally use either “whether” or “if.” But you definitely need “or not” when you mean “regardless of whether,” as in, “I'm out of here whether you like it or not!”

How can I give advice without giving advice?

Steps to Not Giving Advice Ask them Questions about the Problem and their Feelings. Point out Positive Qualities about them to build their confidence in decision making. Share Stories only to offer a perspective or help them feel they are not alone. Do Not make the story about yourself.

Can you use " whether " in an Indian question?

  • Mari-Lou's answer is correct for Standard English. Whether is not used in this manner in Standard English. However in Indian English, it can be used this way. In Indian English, when the questioner isn't sure of something, they can use "Whether?":

When do you use " or not " in a choice?

  • When whether or not is implicit, you may use "or not" for the style or to underline ; it's up to you. But if, "or not" is not implicit - for ex. in a choice with options, we don't use "or not" : "Whether the car will be black, red or white, I shall drive it.".

Can you use " whether " as a question word?

  • You can't use whetheras a question-word like who. It doesn't work like that. – Andrew Leach Nov 18 '13 at 9:08 1 Did she make it blue or green?

When to use " or not " and " whether "?

  • When whether or not is implicit, you may use "or not" for the style or to underline ; it's up to you. But if, "or not" is not implicit - for ex. in a choice with options, we don't use "or not" : "Whether the car will be black, red or white, I shall drive it."

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