Can you use that in place of who?

Can you use that in place of who?

Can you use that in place of who?

'That' in your case is a pronoun which can replace the pronoun who. Generally it is used as the subject or object of a relative clause, especialy one defining or restricting the antecedent, sometimes replaceable by who, whom, or which: the horse that he bought, the man that came, etc.

Is it wrong to use that instead of who?

Rule: Who refers to people. That may refer to people, animals, groups, or things, but who is preferred when referring to people. Example: Anya is the one who rescued the bird. NOTE: While Anya is the one that rescued the bird is also correct, who is preferred.

Why do we use that instead of who?

We use that to introduce defining relative clauses. We can use that instead of who, whom or which to refer to people, animals and things. That is more informal than who or which: She picked up the hairbrush that she had left on the bed.

When can we use that instead of who or which?

When talking about things in defining (restrictive) relative clauses, that should always be used instead of which. When talking about people in defining (restrictive) relative clauses, who is preferred to that.

How do you use who?

When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”' or “'she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition.

When do you use who vs that?

  • As a general rule of thumb use “who” in the singular person, and use “who” and “that” where appropriate in the plural person. But never use “who” to indicate an object/subject, instead use “that” for that purpose.

When do you use who or that?

  • When to Use “That,” “Which,” and “Who”. The proper use of the relative pronouns who, that, and which relate the subject of a sentence to its object, hence the name.

When to use who vs which?

  • Who vs. Whom. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Who or that grammar rule?

  • When two singular subjects are connected by or, use a singular verb . The same is true for either/or and neither/nor. John or Mary is coming tonight. Either coffee or tea is fine. Neither John nor Mary was late. 6. Adjectives usually come before a noun (except when a verb separates the adjective from the noun). I have a big dog.

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