Can you use second conditional?

Can you use second conditional?

Can you use second conditional?

The second conditional is a structure used to talk about impossible or imaginary situations. If I won a lot of money I'd travel the world. Many conditional sentences use if + will/would. ...

What is second conditional sentences examples?

The Second Conditional

  • If I won the lottery, I would buy a big house.(I probably won't win the lottery)
  • If I met the Queen of England, I would say hello.
  • She would travel all over the world if she were rich.
  • She would pass the exam if she ever studied.(She never studies, so this won't happen)

What is 2nd conditional sentences?

The second conditional is used to talk about things which are unreal (not true or not possible) in the present or the future -- things which don't or won't happen: Example. Explanation. If I were you, I would drive more carefully in the rain. I am not you — this is unreal.

What tense is second conditional?

Second conditional Time: present; the TENSE is past, but we are talking about the present, now.

How do you teach a second conditional?

0:2213:43Second Conditional Sentences + Examples | English Grammar LessonYouTube

When should we use second conditional?

Second conditional is used in situations/actions in the present or future which are not likely to happen or are imaginary, hypothetical or impossible. If I won the lottery, I would travel around the world and buy a castle.

How do I practice a second conditional?

Second Conditional Form

  1. If I. (be) you, I. (get) a new job. ...
  2. If he. be. younger, he. ...
  3. If we. (not/be) friends, I. (be) angry with you. ...
  4. If I. (have) enough money, I. ...
  5. If she. (not/be) always so late, she. ...
  6. If we. (win) the lottery, we. ...
  7. If you. (have) a better job, we. ...
  8. If I. (speak) perfect English, I.

Were or second conditional?

In the second conditional, when the verb in the if-clause is a form of be, we use were instead of was. Note that this use of were is possible and recommended with all subjects. Was is also becoming acceptable, but many grammarians still insist that you should use were.

How do you present the second conditional?

The second conditional is a structure we use to talk about imaginary/hypothetical situations in the present or future. How it is formed: use the past simple in the if-clause; use would + the infinitive tense in the result clause.

How many conditional sentences are there?

There are 4 basic types of conditionals: zero, first, second, and third. It's also possible to mix them up and use the first part of a sentence as one type of conditional and the second part as another.

How to teach the second conditional?

  • Introduction to lesson plan. This lesson plan is designed for intermediate prep school students. ...
  • Materials. Reading text: What Would Happen if All Animals were as Smart as us? ...
  • Pre-reading activity. What If All Animals on Earth Were Reasonable? ...
  • The main activity. ...
  • Questions. ...
  • Answers. ...
  • Post-reading activity. ...
  • Assignment. ...
  • Optional exercise. ...

How to use "conditional" in a sentence?

  • Conditional in a sentence This is conditional on the overall plan. She has been granted conditional bail. He was found guilty and given a conditional discharge . Their support is conditional on his proposals meeting their approval. Their success is conditional, I suggest, on this restriction. The judge gave him a one-year conditional discharge.

How many types of conditional sentences are there?

  • Types of Conditional Sentences a. "Real" Conditionals (Zero Conditional) Real conditionals (also called zero conditionals) are sentences expressing the real conditions for things that happen, not hypothetical things (see Imagined Conditionals). b. "Imagined" Conditionals. ... c. Other Forms. ...

What does conditional sentence mean?

  • Updated Decem. In English grammar, a conditional sentence is a type of sentence that expresses one situation (the condition, antecedent, or protasis in a dependent clause) as a condition for the occurrence of another situation (the result, consequent, or apodosis in the main clause).

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