Is it correct to say off of?

Is it correct to say off of?

Is it correct to say off of?

Many grammar experts maintain that “off of” is always wrong but I think that is a rule that is made to be broken, at least occasionally. The most common arguments against “off of” are that “of” is unnecessary and that two prepositions should never be placed side-by-side.

Is it off of or of?

"Off" is the opposite of "on." It is pronounced "OFF." "Of" is most commonly used to show possession (e.g., an uncle of Mr. Jones) or to show what something is made of (e.g., a wall of ice).

Where do we use off and of?

Off? Of is a preposition that indicates relationships between other words, such as belonging, things made of other things, things that contain other things, or a point of reckoning. Off is usually used as an adverb or a preposition.

What does off of means?

Off of is defined as another way of saying off. An example of off of is telling someone to remove their hands from you, to take their hands off of you. preposition. 3. 2.

Can you say off off?

You can't, because it's not. There are thousands of examples of “off of” in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, not just in spoken English, but in magazines, newspapers, and academic journals as well. “Off of” is well-established as standard in American English.

Is off of redundant?

However, the Oxford English Dictionary labels it “in later use only colloq. (nonstandard) and regional.” In other words, this construction was once standard, but is no longer. For centuries, nobody considered the “of” redundant. The OED says that “off of” may have been around since the mid-15th century.

Where can you use off?

Off can be used in the following ways: as an adverb: He waved and drove off. She took her coat off and hung it up.My house is a long way off. as a preposition: She got off the bus at the next stop.

Why do Americans say off?

“Off of” is well-established as standard in American English. Plain “off” may be stylistically preferable in many cases, but it is simply not a rule of English grammar that if a word could be removed it must be removed. Some people seem to think that such a rule exists.

Where can I use off?

Off is used to show disconnection from a person, place or object, i.e. away from someone or something. Generally, we use off after verbs, making it phrasal verbs, such as turn off, call off, put off, take off, go off, runoff, drive off and so forth.

How do you use off in a sentence?

Off to sentence example

  1. Destiny wandered off to her room to play. ...
  2. I hope I pop off to someplace fascinating! ...
  3. Abruptly, he dropped her hand and turned away, marching off to his car. ...
  4. She finished her breakfast with little conversation and saw Sarah and Tammy off to church. ...
  5. He turned and marched off to the house.

When do you use off instead of on?

  • When to Use Off. Off is the opposite of on: The radio was on, but she needed peace and quiet so she turned it off . You should always make sure the stove is turned off before leaving the house. Off can also be used when we want to say that something is away from a place: He was walking his dog without a leash, and the dog ran off .

When do you use the word off in a sentence?

  • You should always make sure the stove is turned off before leaving the house. Off can also be used when we want to say that something is away from a place: He was walking his dog without a leash, and the dog ran off . After walking Taylor home, Steve set off into the city.

Is the word " off of " a rule in English?

  • “Off of” is well-established as standard in American English. Plain “off” may be stylistically preferable in many cases, but it is simply not a rule of English grammar that if a word could be removed it must be removed. Some people seem to think that such a rule exists. It does not.

When do you use off as an adverb?

  • Off is usually used as an adverb or a preposition. In both cases, it indicates separation or disconnection. Here’s a tip: Want to make sure your writing always looks great?

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