Can you use etc in a paper?

Can you use etc in a paper?

Can you use etc in a paper?

It is perfectly ok to use etc. in an academic paper. Just note, however, that both of them are very sparingly and carefully used in serious writing. Try to list fully or describe the list instead.

Is etc acceptable in formal writing?

A. The expression “et cetera” is rarely used. Its abbreviation “etc.” is discouraged in formal writing; CMOS recommends that, if used, it should be confined to parenthetical material or lists and tables.

How do you write an etc in a formal essay?

A good way to test whether etc. is appropriate is to substitute “and so on” or “and so forth.” If those synonyms make sense, you can use etc. You should never use “and et cetera.” Remember, et means “and.” “And et cetera” is redundant. Usage note: Don't use a comma after etc. if it is at the end of the sentence.

How do you use etc in a research paper?

Generally, in American English, if "etc." is used in the middle of a sentence, it is followed by a comma. (Tennis, soccer, baseball, etc., are outdoor games.) However, if this word appears at the end of a sentence then the period (which is part of "etc.") serves as the final punctuation mark.

Do you put a full stop after etc?

Answer: Generally, in American English, if "etc." is used in the middle of a sentence, it is followed by a comma. However, if the word "etc." appears at the end of a sentence then the period (which is part of "etc.") serves as the final punctuation mark.

Should etc have a period?

In American English, etc. ends in a period, even midsentence. It is traditionally enclosed in commas when it doesn't end a sentence, but nowadays the comma that follows etc. is disappearing. ... The Chicago Manual of Style says that etc.

Why etc is bad?

Why I'm against putting etc in your sales copy There are two reasons why including 'etc' in any of your sales messaging is a poor decision. One: It looks lazy. ... Two: Whacking 'etc' in sales copy as an attempt to suggest there are more features and benefits than there actually are, isn't smart. Don't ever do that.

Does etc need a full stop?

If a statement ends with “etc.” the period in the abbreviation does double duty, serving as the full stop to end the sentence. If, however, you need another mark of punctuation after an abbreviation, you can put it after the period.

Do you need and before etc?

There's no definitive answer, because different style guides recommend different usage. Nevertheless, the style that seems to be recommended the most is to always include a comma before “etc.”; it is recommended even by those who discourage the use of the Oxford comma (the comma before the last item in a list).

Does etc end a sentence?

Answer: Generally, in American English, if "etc." is used in the middle of a sentence, it is followed by a comma. However, if the word "etc." appears at the end of a sentence then the period (which is part of "etc.") serves as the final punctuation mark.

Is it suitable to use'etc.'in an academic paper?

  • It is perfectly ok to use etc. in an academic paper. Just note, however, that both of them are very sparingly and carefully used in serious writing. Try to list fully or describe the list instead. I would recommend not using etc. in an academic paper. And if you do, please be sure you are using it correctly.

Is it bad to use etc.In writing?

  • I wouldn't advise 'etc.' to be used in writing. I think it is a lazy way to say something when you run out of words to express it. It doesn't sound that bad in spoken English though. This reminds me of the movie 'The King and I'.

When do you use etc in a sentence?

  • How to Use “Etc.”. Et cetera is a Latin phrase. The abbreviation of et cetera is etc. Use etc. when you begin a list that you will not complete; it indicates that there are other items in the list besides the ones you explicitly mention.

Is it OK to use etcetera in academic writing?

  • But if you plan on using etcetera in academic writing, you will need to understand the rules. And that what this article is all about. So here goes. The term “et cetera” actually comes from Latin, and it means “so forth” or “and other similar things.” And using etcetera in academic writing is perfectly fine, as long as you do it right.

Related Posts: